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Growing Your Business with Minor Roof Repairs Part 2

As a roofing contractor, you’re constantly balancing a workload split between lucrative projects that will help you generate the greatest possible profit margin and less lucrative projects that will expand your customer base and lead to similarly profitable projects down the road. Growing your business isn’t easy. It requires focus, flexibility, and an ardent commitment to quality whether you’re replacing one shingle or one-thousand shingles. In other words, minor roof repairs can be just as important as major roofing projects.

In part one of this two-part series, a roofing attorney in Tennessee discussed some of the minor roof repairs that roofing contractors can utilize to acquire new clientele. Now, we will continue to discuss this topic focusing on repairs for worn sealant, missing shingles, damaged vent boots, and corroded vertical slits.

Worn Sealant

Sealant is used to prevent leaks around flashing and near the edges of skylights. When sealant gets old and cracks, it can no longer seal off passages which results in leaks. The cost of a tube of flashing sealant is relatively minor, but it takes an experienced roofer to properly re-caulk or apply new tar to prevent another breach. In most cases, the roofer will have to remove surrounding materials to properly apply new sealant.

Damaged or Missing Shingles

Damaged or missing shingles are extremely common. The external factors that typically lead to damaged or missing shingles includes:

  • Severe weather
  • Deterioration of protective surface granules
  • Cracked or broken by animals
  • Hail cracks or breaks them
  • Ice dams or pools of water weigh on them

Although replacing shingles is a relatively simple procedure, a professional roofer can take proactive measures to protect the roof from future damage. They can also use this time to assess the roof and suggest other repairs.

Damaged Vent Boot

A vent boot helps seal the area around a vent to protect it against moisture. It’s very similar to the flashing that seals other parts of a roof. When a vent boot becomes damaged, it can lead to problematic leaks. A roofer will need to remove the vent boot and replace it with a new one. After clearing away any surrounding materials, they will nail and caulk the vent boot.

Corroded Vertical Slits

Slits between roofing tiles are ripe for corrosion. When water flows through these slits, it can strip away the protective material to reveal the underlying roofing materials. Although the solution to corroded vertical slits is as simple as replacing the corroded shingles, this can be an early warning sign that your roof is deteriorating.

Remember, although major projects typically lead to the largest profits, minor repairs can help your firm improve its reputation, increase business, and procure lucrative contracts in the future.

If you would like to speak with a roofing lawyer in Tennessee, please contact us today.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

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